RECORDINGS

LABEL: SONY CLASSICS
CATALOG NUMBER: 50243
UPC NUMBER: 0886975024322
NUMBER OF DISCS: 1
RUNNING TIME: 55:42
YEAR RECORDED: 2009
CD RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 6, 2009
CONDUCTOR: KEITH LOCKHART
ORCHESTRA: THE BOSTON POPS
CHOIR: UNKNOWN
SOPRANO: LACHANZE
CONTRALTO: N/A
TENOR: MIG AYESA
BARITONE: J. ROBERT SPENCER


AUDIO SAMPLES HIGHLIGHTS OTHER RELEASES


DISC ONE

1. Overture    (Orchestra; Band)     3:11
2. Comfort Ye    (Mig Ayesa)    4:55
3. He'll Come In Glory    (LaChanze)    3:42
4. He Is Fire    (J. Robert Spencer)    4:20
5. Rejoice    (Mig Ayesa; LaChanze; J. Robert Spencer)    8:05
6. Behold the Lamb of God    (Mig Ayesa)    1:51
7. He Was Despised    (J. Robert Spencer)    5:19
8. He Trusted You    (LaChanze; Antoine Silverman)    4:13
9. King of Glory   (Mig Ayesa)    3:26
10. He Is My Son    (J. Robert Spencer)    5:05
11. How Beautiful    (LaChanze)    3:28
12. Hallelujah    (J. Robert Spencer; LaChanze; MiG Ayesa)    4:24
13. A Child Is Born    (LaChanze; J. Robert Spencer; MiG Ayesa)    3:35

SITE RATING:  0/10
SITE REVIEW:  There are two schools of thought about bringing classical music to the "masses."   The first school, which Leonard Bernstein promoted through programs like his Leonard Bernstein: Omnibus - The Historic TV Broadcasts, is to educate people so that they could learn the history, meaning, and power of great music, expanding their appreciation and knowledge; thereby "raising them up" to the bar of high art.  The second school of thought is to "dumb down" the music to the perceived level of the great unwashed, lowest-common-denominator layman.  The first school is harder; it takes a master teacher, patience, humor, and intelligence.  The second school is easier; it makes everything loud, fast, and flashes bright lights in order to "numb" the audience into a slobbering, dead-eyed pool of sludge.  It was this second school of thought that created Messiah Rocks!    Screaming guitars, thundering drums, banshee-wailing soloists, and mindless sing-alongs, stripping Handel's masterpiece of feeling, inspiration, and art, and turning it into banal Christian-lite pop-rock.  In truth, there is very little of Handel's Messiah to be found here - it's only been sampled - you'll hear fits and starts of it between the entirely forgettable Christian pop songs.  The soloists, pulled from the "Disney Princess" roster and Broadway, have certainly learned to belt; but have mistaken volume for passion.  Keith Lockhart, poster child for classical banality, is a slave to the producer's MTV-inspired vision, while everything sung and played withers and dies before the real Messiah.


The Compleat Messiah All Content Copyright 2009 Bret D. Wheadon
All Rights Reserved.