RECORDINGS

LABEL: METACOM INC.
CATALOG NUMBER: 0303635
UPC NUMBER: 099745678261
NUMBER OF DISCS: 1
RUNNING TIME: 38:02
YEAR RECORDED: 1962?
CD RELEASE DATE: 1992
CONDUCTOR: J. RANDOLPH JONES
ORCHESTRA: ST. PAUL'S CHAMBER ORCHESTRA?
CHOIR: ST. PAUL'S CHOIR?
SOPRANO: UNKNOWN
CONTRALTO: UNKNOWN
TENOR: UNKNOWN
BASS: UNKNOWN


AUDIO SAMPLES OTHER RELEASES

NONE

DISC ONE

1 Hallelujah 4:08
2 Every Valley Shall be Exalted 3:18
3 O Thou That Tellest Good Tidings to Zion 5:29
4 How Beautiful Are the Feet 2:35
5. Why do the Nations 2:15
6. For Unto us a Child is Born 2:48
7. Comfort Ye my People 3:21
8 He Trusted in God 2:16
9. I Know That my Redeemer Liveth 4:42
10. The Trumpet Shall Sound 3:40
11. Amen 2:47

SITE RATING:  1/10
SITE REVIEW:  This is a recording with an extremely murky provenance.  It is indisputably under the baton of J. Randolph Jones, and most likely released in 1962 (via an original advertisement found in the Cincinnati Enquirer from the era).  J. Randolph Jones was the conductor of the Jersey City Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, (which was staffed with members of the NBC Symphony and the New York Philharmonic, with John Corigliano (Sr.) as its concertmaster), and who also guest conducted in Mexico City.  Previously released in 1976 on the Everest label (SDBR 3398), and originally credited to 'Soloist, Chorus and Chamber Orchestra of the Pro Musica Antiqua', label Metacom Inc. re-released this album crediting the choir and orchestra of St. Paul's Cathedral under the baton of Randolph Jones.  Madacy records has also released this album (again credited to "Pro Antiqua") as part of its Ultimate Christmas Collection box set, and www.ReDiscovery.us lists it under the nom de plume Kurt von Baum (who was a faux-Nazi character in a French-Italian musical comedy The Crazy Kids of War (1967), starring Terrence Hill) and the Homburg Symphony.  But regardless, it's all the same recording.  Whatever guise it appears in, it needs to be avoided, since the sound is abysmal, the performance is ham-handed, and the track order is completely random.  I suspect that this release was mastered from vinyl sources - there is an underlying "buzz" in the recorded sound which sounds throughout, as well as occasional distortion in the upper and lower ranges.  As to the performance, it's strictly by-the-numbers: the chorus sound like a basic community choir with wide-spread vowels; the tenor soloist is cursed with a wobbly vibrato in his otherwise boyish tone, the orchestra plays well, but with little distinction, the alto soloist is similarly b-class; the bass soloist combines all the worst qualities of throaty, heavy singing, and the soprano occasionally slides up to her upper register.  As I said in a previous review - the mystery surrounding this recording is more interesting than the recording itself.  Consider this one for the scrap heap.


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